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Grilled Cilantro Lime Corn

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08/07/2016
Grilled Cilantro Lime Corn

Grilled cilantro lime corn cooked on the grill with some butter and salt. Oh my lawd! Life is good.

Some recipes just sort of happen, like this one. We had corn on the cob languishing in the refrigerator.  Mannie had just started the grill. And I was poking my head in and out of the frig trying to figure out what to cook with the steaks.  If it had been just me, dinner would have been steak and wine. But, since I am trying to set a better eating example than that for my child, and Mannie doesn’t drink wine, I knew I needed at least one vegetable.

I pulled out the package of corn I bought.  Some years we grow corn.  This year we were kinda busy opening Mingos Nursery & Garden Center so a lot of things didn’t get planted.

A brief note about growing corn.

Corn is pretty easy to grow but tends to blow over if not supported.  Farmers and larger scale gardeners take care of the problem of the corn stalks blowing over by planting a LOT of corn in a tight space, often in those tidy rows that make me happy.  I am unable to plant anything in tidy rows, not for lack of trying however.  When planted tightly together, the corn supports itself.  But tightly planted plants of any type can have pest and disease issues that get out of hand before you notice.

When we grow corn we will grow it along a fence where it can be tied back as it gets tall and top heavy or in a spot that is sheltered from the wind.  Corn is also a heavy feeder meaning you want to have a lot of composted organic matter in the soil and even then you may need to feed it regularly with a liquid fertilizer.

But back to the recipe.

So I pulled the corn out of the frig, put it on the counter and sort of stared at it.  Most dinner preparation starts this way for me.  Maybe someday I will learn to plan meals (…doubtful…).  As I was meditating on the corn I noticed the limes on the counter and was inspired.  With cilantro from the garden, some course salt, and a little butter, we have a vegetable dish. Scroll down for the recipe!

Print Recipe
Grilled Cilantro and Lime Corn
Fresh from the garden (or produce department) goodness.
Grilled Cilantro Lime Corn
Course Side Dish
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Side Dish
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Grilled Cilantro Lime Corn
Instructions
  1. Take a piece of aluminum foil and lay it on the counter. It needs to be big enough to wrap up all four ears of corn for cooking on the grill.
  2. Butter each ear of corn then place the buttered ears in the center of the foil. The buttering does not need to be particularly even.
  3. Spread the chopped cilantro over the top of the buttered ears of corn.
  4. Cut the lime in half and squeeze out all the juice over the ears of corn.
  5. Sprinkle with salt.
  6. Wrap the foil around the ears of corn, sealing it up tight to keep in all the liquid. Put on the grill for 10 - 15 minutes, turning over halfway through cooking.
  7. Once it is done cooking, open the foil carefully. That steam in there will burn you. Enjoy!
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Herb Gardens – Simple & Rewarding

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17/05/2016
Herb garden
Woolly thyme, Carl Forester grass, petunias, and potted peppers make a beautiful vignette

Woolly thyme, Carl Forester grass, petunias, and potted peppers make a beautiful vignette.

Have you ever wanted to step outside of your traditional landscape and try a little garden of your own but didn’t know where to start? Or worse, were afraid of failure? If this is you, a great first garden is an Herb Garden. Herb gardens are easy; and by easy I mean low maintenance and hard to kill.

 

Onion Flower

Onion Flower

Most herbs are heat and drought tolerant with few pest issues.  Just pick a sunny spot with good drainage.

 

Unlike for most gardens, herbs don’t really need a well prepared bed or super nutritious soil (remember, some people grow dandelions as herbs and dandelions can grow anywhere).  In fact, herb plants that are fertilized regularly look lush and beautiful but tend to be lacking in flavor and fragrance.

Sage

Sage

 

Many herbs can grow where other plants just cannot.  In the opening photo woolly thyme is growing between the stone steps softening the look of the front walk.  Herbs can be grown in their own dedicated herb bed, grouped together in pots, or tucked into your landscaping. I love to add herbs to my more traditional landscape, especially that one corner where the sprinkler just doesn’t quite reach.

 

They also make a great addition to a vegetable garden adding both interest, variety, and sometimes pest control.  And did I mention, herbs are beautiful? Herbs are beautiful!  My herb garden is also full of honey bees.

Chives are beautiful, hard to kill, and super yummy!

Chives are beautiful, hard to kill, and super yummy!

 

 

And as a bonus, most herbs are culinary, meaning you can eat them! Try adding some fresh chives to your baked potato, rosemary to your dinner rolls, or sage to your chicken.

Oregano

Oregano

 

Come see us at Mingos Nursey & Garden Center! We have everything you need, including the know-how, to start your own herb garden.

 

Vegetables & Herbs are Here!

Categories: Tags:
05/03/2016
veggies and herbs

herbsWe have veggies and herbs!

We’re open 8:30 – 6:30 Monday – Saturday and 12:00 – 5:30 on Sundays.  Ready for delicious tomatoes? With so many tomato varieties and uses in the kitchen, it’s no wonder tomatoes are one of our most popular vegetables! We receive a lot of customer requests for additional tips and tricks on sowing and growing the best tomatoes.

When to start tomatoes

Start tomatoes indoors 4 to 6 weeks before average last spring frost, and transplant them out when daytime temperatures are at least 45°F, and soil temperature is ideally 70 – 90 degrees.
In mild climates/hot summer areas, tomatoes are transplanted in December-April or July-Feb. Contact your county extension office or a local independent garden center for the best time for your area.

Containers

Use shallow, sterile containers with drainage (4- or 6-pack at a garden center). Transplant into larger, 3″-4″ containers once the true, scalloped leaves have emerged. Biodegradable paperboard pots (link) are the ideal size, easy to label, and easy to share with friends.

Seed Starting Mix

Use a lightweight seed starting mix/media, and sow seeds at a shallow, 1/8″-1/4″ depth. Seed-starting mix is sterile (unlike garden soil) and lighter than potting mix, allowing for the ideal air-to-moisture ratio.

Transplanting and Supporting

When transplanting seedlings outside, either 1) plant them deeply, burying the stem leaving 1-2 sets of leaves above ground; or 2) set each plant almost horizontally in the ground leaving 2 sets of leaves above ground. The buried part of the stem will sprout roots and develop a strong, extensive root system. The top of the seedling above ground will naturally reach toward the sun and right itself. Place any stakes, cages, or other type of supports in the ground just after transplanting to avoid root damage.

Growing Temperature

Temperatures above 55°F at night are required for fruit set. Night temperatures above 75°F in the summer inhibit fruit set and can cause blossom drop (no fruit production). Wait until night temperatures are at least 45°F before transplanting.

Water

Tomatoes need about 1″-2″ of water per week, depending on the type of soil they are growing in. 1 or 2 deep soakings per week in mild weather, and 2 or 3 per week in hot weather should be sufficient. If tomatoes are cracking, back off on the water. Too much water can burst tomatoes and water down the flavor.

Harvesting

Each variety is different when it comes to color. Check your seed packet to see when the tomato is ripe.

Tomato Types

Tomatoes are grouped into two main types according to growth habit and production. DETERMINATE types (e.g., Ace 55, Glacier, Italian Roma) grow in a compact, bush form, requiring little or no staking. Fruit is produced on the ends of the branches; most of the crop ripens at the same time. One or more successive plantings will ensure an extended harvest period. Determinate types are often the choice of those who want a large supply of ripe fruit at once for canning. INDETERMINATE (e.g., Better Bush, Sun Gold, Black Krim) varieties continue to grow and produce fruit all season until first frost. Tomatoes in all stages of development may be on the plants at one time. The plants set fruit clusters along a vining stem, which grows vigorously and long. Under optimum conditions, some can grow over 15′, but in most home gardens they generally reach about 6′. Some indeterminates have a bush form with stockier vines, which set fruit clusters closer together. In between these two types are the SEMI-DETERMINATE (e.g., Lizzano). The plants will grow larger than determinate varieties, but not as large as indeterminate. They produce a main crop that ripens at once, but also continue to produce up until frost.

Cherry Tomato - Lizzano Bush Tomato - Glacier Pole Tomato - Black Krim Bush Tomato - Ace

Mingos Nursery & Garden Center

9744 E. Bankhead Hwy.
Aledo, TX 76008
817-441-MINGOS (817-441-6464)
contact@mingos.biz